It Is… The Ryder Cup

Golf:  A gentleman’s game.  The epitome of civility.

But for three days every other autumn, civility turns to hostility.  Tranquility turns to frenzy.  All for a four-pound trophy of gold and timber.  It stands 17 inches tall, but in the golf world stands much taller.  It represents the pride and pageantry of competing for team and country.  It is… the Ryder Cup.

Samuel Ryder’s vision of an international match between the 12 best golfers from the United States and the 12 best from the British Isles became reality in 1927.  After a half-century of American dominance, the Great Britain and Ireland team expanded to include continental Europe in 1979, and what has followed biennially since has been extraordinary.

Four frantic affairs at The Belfry.  The War by The Shore.  The Miracle at Brookline.  Azinger’s personality pods at Valhalla.  The Miracle (or Meltdown) at Medinah.  Each ensuing edition has become part of the annals of Ryder Cup history.

The pressure here is like no other stage in golf.  Men accustomed to playing the ultimate individual’s game are suddenly playing for much more than themselves.  Some have crumbled under the unparalleled tension, while others have triumphed and become legendary.  Grown men have been reduced to tears, both of agony and of ecstasy.

This week, 24 of the greatest golfers in the world converge in Minnesota, each with the goal of helping their team pursue golf’s most glorious prize.  By Sunday evening, any one of them could be the hero with his name on a new chapter of golf history.

It is one of the greatest rivalries in sport.  It is the battle between Europe and the United States.  It is incomparable drama.  It is… the Ryder Cup.

 

 

Ryder Cup TV Schedule

Friday:  8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. (Golf Channel)
Saturday:  9 a.m. to 7 p.m. (NBC)
Sunday:  12 p.m. to 6 p.m. (NBC)

Ryder Cup Matches

1927:  United States 9.5, Great Britain 2.5
1929:  Great Britain 7, United States 5
1931:  United States 9, Great Britain 3
1933:  Great Britain 6.5, United States 5.5
1935:  United States 9, Great Britain 3
1937:  United States 8, Great Britain 4
1939-45:  no matches due to World War II
1947:  United States 11, Great Britain 1
1949:  United States 7, Great Britain 5
1951:  United States 9.5, Great Britain 2.5
1953:  United States 6.5, Great Britain 5.5
1955:  United States 8, Great Britain 4
1957:  Great Britain 7.5, United States 4.5
1959:  United States 8.5, Great Britain 3.5
1961:  United States 14.5, Great Britain 9.5
1963:  United States 23, Great Britain 9
1965:  United States 19.5, Great Britain 12.5
1967:  United States 23.5, Great Britain 8.5
1969:  United States 16, Great Britain 16 (U.S. retains the Cup)
1971:  United States 18.5, Great Britain 13.5
1973:  United States 19, Great Britain & Ireland 13
1975:  United States 21, Great Britain & Ireland 11
1977:  United States 12.5, Great Britain & Ireland 7.5
1979:  United States 17, Europe 11
1981:  United States 18.5, Europe 9.5
1983:  United States 14.5, Europe 13.5
1985:  Europe 16.5, United States 11.5
1987:  Europe 15, United States 13
1989:  Europe 14, United States 14 (Europe retains the Cup)
1991:  United States 14.5, Europe 13.5
1993:  United States 15, Europe 13
1995:  Europe 14.5, United States 13.5
1997:  Europe 14.5, United States 13.5
1999:  United States 14.5, Europe 13.5
2001:  matches postponed due to 9/11 attacks
2002:  Europe 15.5, United States 12.5
2004:  Europe 18.5, United States 9.5
2006:  Europe 18.5, United States 9.5
2008:  United States 16.5, Europe 11.5
2010:  Europe 14.5, United States 13.5
2012:  Europe 14.5, United States 13.5
2014:  Europe 16.5, United States 11.5

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3 thoughts on “It Is… The Ryder Cup

  1. Go USA ! Great article.

  2. Pingback: Fast Five: 2016 Year in Review | Stiles On Sports

  3. Pingback: Stiles on Sports’ Best of 2016 | Stiles On Sports

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