SportsShorts: Rain delays, retractable roofs and Stranger Things

Pop-up summer showers often present a dilemma for baseball’s umpires and groundskeepers. If you tarp the field and the rain ends quickly, it will still take 20 or 30 minutes to get the field ready despite the small amount of rain, but if you decide to wait out the rain and it intensifies, the field may be lost for the night.

Monday’s game between the Atlanta Braves and New York Mets found itself in such a quandary.

After a beautiful day in Georgia, a pop-up shower hit SunTrust Park as the game was in the middle of the sixth inning — and the situation produced a rather bizarre rain delay.

The umpiring crew, led by crew chief Sam Holbrook, directed the Braves’ grounds crew to tarp the field. Head groundskeeper Ed Mangan discussed the situation with the umpires, showing them radar and weather forecasts that projected the storm would quickly pass.

As Mangan and the umpires held their discussion on the field, the grounds crew stopped and stared, waiting for further direction as the tarp was around 1/3 of the way pulled; this holding pattern continued for around 10 minutes, a period that also included a fan running onto the field.

Finally, after much discussion and the rain continuing off and on, the decision was made to take the tarp off the field. The grounds crew moved quickly, putting the tarp back at its post along the third-base-side wall and touching up the mound and infield. Play resumed after a delay totaling 15 minutes, although the teams had to wait a few extra seconds after Braves coaches Eric Young and Ron Washington were late getting in place at first and third base; the Braves went on to win 12-3.

In the midst of the delay, Braves broadcaster Chip Caray humorously noted the peculiarity of what was happening: “I can’t think of a more apropos promo to read during this delay: Stranger Things Night at SunTrust Park is Wednesday, July 3…”

This was not the first unusual rain delay involving the Braves in recent years. On Opening Day of the 2015 season, the Braves were playing the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park, which has a retractable roof.

But after the game began with the roof open on what had been a clear spring day, one of those patented South Florida showers popped up in the second inning and caused a 16-minute rain delay as the teams waited for the roof to be closed. Yes, an indoor stadium had a rain delay.

You may think that Monday’s 15-minute delay must be one of the shortest ever seen, but I’ve witnessed three shorter — all in the same game. In a 2016 Coastal Plain League game at Asheboro, N.C.’s McCrary Park — which has an artificial turf infield that doesn’t need to be tarped — three passing showers hit the park during the game.

In each instance, the teams waited for the rain to stop and then resumed playing almost immediately when the skies cleared. The three rain delays totaled around 30 minutes, with the shortest lasting just seven minutes.

Rain delays can be stranger things indeed.

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SportsShorts: Indy 500 win comes full circle for Pagenaud, Chevrolet and France

In 1920, French-born driver Gaston Chevrolet won the Indianapolis 500, becoming the third Frenchman to win in the first eight editions of the event.

Little did anyone know it would be 99 years before a French driver would again win at the greatest spectacle in racing.

Sunday, some 36,154 days later, the day belonged to Poitiers, France native Simon Pagenaud. The 2016 IndyCar Series champion won the race’s 103rd edition from the pole, earning triumph over 2016 Indy 500 winner Alexander Rossi in a riveting final-laps battle.

Pagenaud soaked in the win for himself and his country, stopping on the track at the start-finish line and delaying the traditional victory-lane celebration and milk-drinking to celebrate with his team, family and friends. Perhaps Chevrolet had done the same nearly a century earlier.

If you’re wondering if Gaston Chevrolet has something to do with that Chevrolet, you’d be correct — as I found out in some brief research after Sunday’s race.

His brother Louis Chevrolet founded the Chevrolet Motor Car Company in 1911 after moving to the United States. Gaston, Louis and brother Arthur co-founded the Frontenac Motor Corporation in 1916, a racecar manufacturer, and all three competed in the Indianapolis 500 multiple times, including Gaston’s 1920 victory.

Frontenac also won the 1921 Indy 500 with driver Tommy Milton before the company folded later that year. Chevrolet, of course, has become one of the largest auto brands in the world and is heavily involved in many forms of auto racing, including IndyCar.

Chevrolet eventually earned their first Indianapolis 500 win as a manufacturer with Rick Mears in 1988; Sunday was their 11th.

Hopefully Pagenaud’s fate after his 500 victory is better than that of Gaston Chevrolet: While his 500 triumph helped propel him to the AAA National Championship in 1920, he was killed in the season’s final race in Los Angeles.