Fans Week: Creatures in the Bleachers

 

I’ve covered a number of different events in my three years as a freelance sports writer.

While covering games, I’ve written down some of the craziest things I’ve heard and seen from fans.

Here is the best of these, plus a few from events I’ve attended as a fan that I have remembered since:

 

-After a baserunner was caught stealing:  “She might have to spend a night in jail… because she got caught.”

-From the ‘Ma’am, I don’t think that’s what you meant’ department:  “Y’all better shut #24 down… make him foul you out.”

-“Forget a foul…that’s abuse!”

-As a fan is accusing the both the officials and the scorekeepers of helping the home team:  “There’s no reason y’all shouldn’t be undefeated at home.”

-A man at a girl’s event:  “She has a mustache.  She’s a man.  She has more facial hair than I do.”

-After a basketball player traveled:  “He kicked him!”  Sure, but he still walked.

-“He hit the ball right out of his hand!”  Yeah, in basketball that’s called a steal.

-“If you’re gonna lie, at least tell a good one!”

-In basketball:  “Are they not calling three seconds tonight?”  Sir, I’ve seen three seconds called about five times the last five years.

-“They’re just making up calls down there!”

-“Is that a new rule I haven’t heard of?”

-I always find it humorous when players, coaches, or fans yell and fuss at officials, yet still say “Mr. Ref.”

-A fan at Anderson Motor Speedway threw a beer can at a car (under caution)… and actually hit it.  After the man was escorted from the premises, the public address announcer said “Any fans who throw things on the track or are a public disturbance in any way will earn a night’s stay in the graybar motel, courtesy of the Anderson County Sheriff’s Department.”

-At the PGA Tour’s Wyndham Championship, a fan climbed down into a creek (and may have gone under the ropes in the process) to pick up a random golf ball in the creek.

-At a Clemson at Wake Forest football game in 2005, a Wake Forest fan behind me spelled “D-E-A-C-O-N-S” at the end of Tiger Rag.  I was 10 and unfamiliar with Tiger Rag (and couldn’t hear the Wake Forest fan particularly well either), so for a few minutes I couldn’t figure out what Clemson fans were spelling that was seven letters and ended in “S.”  (For those who are unfamiliar with Tiger Rag, Clemson fans spell “C-L-E-M-S-O-N” over the song’s final beats.)

-At a football game, a fan yelled “Fumble…. Fumble….” every play, trying to implore the opponent to turn the ball over.  Said opponent did not fumble in this particular game, but threw two interceptions.

-I’m a Wake Forest fan, and went to a Wake Forest-Clemson basketball game at Littlejohn with Garrett, a diehard Clemson fan.  When Clemson won at the buzzer, he cheered “Yeaaah! Yeaaah! (turns to me) Sorry. (turns back to the court) Yeaaah!”

-A public address announcer after multiple penalties:  “Holding on Mullins.  Personal foul on Mullins.  Shot in the foot on Mullins.”

-A public address announcer during a lengthy game with a lot of penalties:  “We’re starting our 50th season of football tonight, and we’ll be in the 51st season by the time this game is over with.”

-“Check your phone, ref, because you’ve got some more missed calls.”

-As an opposing coach argues:  “Cry me a river”

-The saddest group of people I’ve ever been in (excluding funerals) was actually at a sporting event.  At the 2011 Coca-Cola 600, Dale Earnhardt Jr. was stuck in a long winless streak, but led on the final lap until running out of fuel, allowing Kevin Harvick to win.  The stands were loud while Earnhardt Jr. led, but after he lost the race it was as if you could hear the silence over the roar of the engines.

On the field/court:

-In the third quarter of a three-point game in basketball, a coach told his team, “We’re still in it.”  Well, I’d hope you feel that way.

-A big celebration on a ordinary “And-1” play in basketball that put the team up by 31 points.

-A player in an off-field conversation:  “Football is tough.  The refs cheat.”

-A conversation an official and a coach after the other team called timeout:
Referee:  “Full timeout”
Coach:  “You said it was a 30-second”
Referee:  “He doesn’t have one”
Coach:  “Well, that’s his fault”

 

 

Stiles on Sports Fans Week:
Tuesday:  Fans Roundtable, Part I:  Gratifying Wins and Gut-Wrenching Losses
Wednesday:  Fans Roundtable Part II:  Sports Heroes and Hysteria

Thursday:  Creatures in the Bleachers
Friday:  Fast Five:  Famous Fans

Fans Week Roundtable, Part II: Sports Heroes and Hysteria

In Part I of my Stiles on Sports Fans Week roundtable discussion with Justin Kenley (Cardinals, Panthers, North Carolina fan), Ryan Pittman (Cubs, Packers, South Carolina fan) and Garrett Black (Clemson fan), we discussed both exciting wins and heartbreaking losses they’ve experienced as fans.

In Part II, I asked more about their fan experiences, including who they admire on the field and the crazy things they’ve done and seen as a fan.

 

SOS:  Who is your favorite player, and why?

Justin:  For the Panthers it’s hard, but I’ve got to say Luke (Kuechly).  And not even just from that fandom perspective; I just love how he brings it every single play.  The dude is everywhere.  And I guess that’s something that, as a fan, you appreciate a guy going all out.

For the Tar Heels, it’s hard man.  I love me some Marcus Paige, though.  I just love his story.  Kind of a guy that not a lot of people knew, coming out (of high school), and “is he really going to be that good,” and to carry the team the last two years the way he did, that was just, I love Marcus Paige.

And Cardinals, good gosh, if this was six years ago, I would’ve said (Albert) Pujols, without even a wink, definitely.  I don’t know, man, I like so many of them, for different reasons.  There’s very few guys that we’ve had in the last few years that I said, “man, I just don’t like that person.”  If I had to say my top ones, I love Molina (Yadier Molina), because I was a catcher, and I think he’s just amazing at what he does.  I love the way Carp (Matt Carpenter) plays, I love the way Waino (Adam Wainwright) pitches, and then… it’s hard to narrow that one down.

Ryan:  There are three.  Jason Grilli is probably my favorite player of all time.  I met him when I was 10 years old at a baseball camp in Toledo.  He actually taught me how to bunt.  He’s a relief pitcher, and he was a nobody then, and I guess he’s kind of a nobody now, but he’s had some times where he’s been closer with the Pirates, he’s been closer with the Braves, and the occasional game saved for the Blue Jays now.

I met him 12 years ago when he was nobody, and I’ve watched him ascend throughout the major leagues, and he’s almost 40 now and still pitching.  It’s kind of cool to be like, hey, I’ve got his autograph right there.  It’s kind of cool.

Another is Omar Infante.  I just watched him growing up, and he played the same position I did, and he played for the Mud Hens in Toledo.  He played shortstop, then moved to second base; I played shortstop, then moved to second base.  And it was kind of cool.

Carlos Pena is also on that list.  There was one time I called him over to sign his baseball card, and they asked everyone to stand for the national anthem.  He’s holding my pen and my baseball card, and he says “Hold on,” and puts it on the railing, turns to put his hand over his heart for the national anthem, then he grabs the card, signs it, and then runs over to first base to play.  He went from me to first base to start the game, and it was just really cool.

And then he went on the next year, two years later, to hit 40-something home runs for those same Rays that I described earlier, the ’08 Rays, and he became a huge power hitter, and I still remembered that fond memory as a kid.  Kind of changed the way I think about professional athletes.

Garrett:  I’m gonna have to go with Hunter Renfrow.  Not only did he catch the winning touchdown, but he’s got the story and the character to go behind it, and it’s just great to see a former walk-on catch a touchdown and then be vainly tackled by three future draft prospects.

 

SOS:  Who is a “role player” you’ve always liked, and why?

Justin:  Easily Skip Schumaker.  Just a guy that comes, and didn’t matter where he was playing, he was going to bring it, every day.

I’ll never forget in 2013, we went to St. Louis for my graduation present, and the Dodgers were playing, and it was the first time Skip had come back to St. Louis after he got let go, and man, Skip Schumaker, who a lot of people wouldn’t know his name, he got a standing ovation from like 40,000 people in Busch Stadium, and it was awesome.  It was just really, really cool.

If you know the Cardinals, you appreciate what he did.  Because he could play second base, right field, pinch hit.  You knew he was going to do something.

Ryan:  I’ve always been a fan of utility players in baseball.  Currently Ben Zobrist fits that, and I guess there are so many now.  It used to be a lot more rare.

Guys like Martin Prado, who’d play every infield position and every outfield position, and I appreciate that, they might not have a set position that they’re best at, but their bat is valuable enough and their leadership is valuable enough their team can’t take them out.  So they might not have an everyday spot, but they play everyday.

Garrett:  I really have to appreciate Cole Stoudt.  Can we call a backup quarterback a role player?  Because he was never gonna be the guy.

I mean, he was a starting guy, but the expectation was never to win a championship with Cole Stoudt.  But I think he provided leadership to keep the team together, in the Tajh (Boyd) to Deshaun (Watson) handoff, and got hurt just in time for Deshaun to come.  But I think the kind of leadership he provided for the team, in that transition year between Tajh and Deshaun truly taking over, kind of kept that team together.

SOS:  That’s interesting, because that’s not necessarily a popular opinion in Clemson fan circles.

Garrett:  Here’s the thing:  at any other school that wasn’t swimming in quarterback prospects, like Clemson has been lately, Cole Stoudt could’ve started.  I mean, he wasn’t great, and to be fair we kind of got spoiled with Tajh, so we kind of expected we’d get that kind of production, and to be fair we got better later on, but we should’ve known it was going to get worse before it got better.

 

SOS:  Besides your favorite teams’ known archrivals, who is one team you can’t stand?

Justin:  I really don’t like the Reds, but I feel like that falls in that rivalry a little bit.  There’s a couple of NFL teams I don’t like.  Really, the AFC North.  The Ravens, the Bengals, and (my fiance) Courtney would kill me because Courtney is a Bengals fan, but just, the way they play just irks me.  There’s not one team—I hate the Patriots, obviously, but I feel like everybody hates the Patriots, so I feel like that doesn’t really count.

I will say in basketball, I really don’t like Kentucky.  Kentucky just, I love beating Kentucky.  I don’t mind the whole one-and-done movement to an extent, but I kind of hate the way they’ve done it, and I just, I don’t really like Kentucky.

Ryan:  Typically because of fantasy sports, I don’t hate any team, because I need their players.  That’s tricky.

I don’t like the Mets.  I really don’t like the Royals either.   I feel kind of bad saying it, but like the kind of players they had that have now since passed who were frustrating to watch, you know, Yordano Ventura was just annoying… rest in peace.  He was trying to cause fights, and they seemed to be getting into fights with other teams because they didn’t think they were getting the respect they deserved, and I was like, “come on, play the game, earn the respect,” and that was really frustrating recently.  But yeah, the Mets.  The Mets just always beat my team, knocked us out.

Garrett:  Everyone hates Alabama, but we just beat them so I don’t have as much hatred in my heart anymore.  I’m probably going to have to go with Florida State next, although that’s a division rivalry.  It’s hard to hate Pitt (laughs).

I loved beating Ohio State (in the 2016 Fiesta Bowl).  That felt good.  Because everyone was telling us how Urban Meyer’s like the best coach ever, and to be fair, he’s a great coach, but it feels good to topple the big guys.

 

SOS:  Who is one team you wish you had been alive to watch or old enough to remember?

Justin:  I would have loved to seen, and I don’t have a pinpoint year, but I would’ve loved to have seen Stan Musial play for the Cardinals.  Just because he meant so much to my grandpa; I mean, that was my grandpa’s dude.

Ryan:  Actually there’s two.  The Yankees, back when they were with Babe Ruth, and Joe DiMaggio, and those Yankee greats, I’d love to see one of those Yankee teams play.  And then, more recently, but still before me, was the Big Red Machine.  Johnny Bench, Joe Morgan

SOS: Pete Rose

Ryan:  Yeah, I’d love to go back and watch them, because they were a dominant team, but they weren’t in a big city.  They were small market Reds winning games, pretty cool.

Garrett:  ’81 (Clemson), obviously.  That was the other golden era.

 

SOS:  Do you have any strange superstitions when your favorite teams play?

Justin:  If I go to one game, and what I wear works, I wear the same thing again.

Two years ago in the (NFL) playoffs, the first day we went it wasn’t that cold, so I wore my Luke Kuechly jersey, and just a hat or whatever, but then the next game it was really cold, it got colder, and I didn’t care, I just wore the same thing.  We won in this last time, I’ll win in it again.

I’ve never been like a crazy superstitious kind of guy.  I will always, though, if I’m watching my team play, I’m going to wear something of that team.  I will do that, even if it’s just sitting on the couch.

Ryan:  Sometimes, in a game that really matters, in football or baseball playoffs, something like that, if my team is struggling, say, two-thirds of the way through the game, and I’m not wearing any gear of that team, I’ll go track down a Cubs hat or a jersey or a Packers t-shirt, just to see if (it helps), just supporting.  Never the opposite, though.  If I’m wearing gear and they lose, I don’t take it off, but sometimes you’ll get halfway through a game and go, “oh shoot, I’m not supporting my team,” so you do whatever you can to make them get back in business.

Garrett:  I have a mechanical tiger that plays Tiger Rag.  He used to dance, but the wheels broke.  Every time we score any points, I always click his paw and make him play the Tiger Rag song, and while this probably has more to do with Dabo (Swinney) and Deshaun (Watson), it has only been wrong, like, three times in the last four seasons.

SOS:  What do you mean, “it’s only been wrong”?

Garrett:  Like, whenever I hit the button every time when we play, we always win.  Again, that probably has more to do with the players, but I like to think I’m contributing.

 

SOS:  What is a crazy or unique experience you’ve had while watching a game?

Justin:  I remember, it was so funny, because my dad is not a guy to like freak out on TV.  At the game, he’ll freak out and stuff, and yell, but on TV he just doesn’t.  And I vividly remember when Marcus Paige hit that shot (to tie the game) against Villanova last year, the shot that no one will ever remember except Carolina fans, my dad jumped off the couch and just screamed his head off, and was pumped.

And I remember, it was just so funny, because obviously I was caught up in the moment, freaking out, but it was just funny to me, because I was like, “my dad never gets this into it in a game.”

The Seahawks game two years ago in the playoffs (was crazy).  We made that huge run, 15-1, divisional playoffs, and I kid you not, the upper deck where we were sitting at, we did not sit down for the entirety of that game.

Like, we were up at first half, at kickoff, when they came out of the tunnel, and then we sat down at halftime, and then when the clock hit zero we left.  And it was just crazy.  Because like, I’ve been at games where you stand a lot, but just the way that season was rolling, and the electricity in the air, you didn’t want to sit down, and so that was pretty crazy.

I about hit Courtney in the face this year, when Luke Maye hit that shot against Kentucky.  I really did.  I was punching the air, I was going nuts.

I will say, I am really weird about, like—regular season, and I can just sit on my couch and chill, but like, if it’s the playoffs, I bring a chair, and I sit probably as close as me and you to the TV, and I’m in it.  I’m in it.  Because it’s every pitch.

Ryan:  I was at Wrigley Field in 2003 when Barry Bonds, in batting practice, hit a baseball over Sheffield, through a window across the street, and that video’s kind of gone popular now, a cool “I didn’t do it,” you know, that was pretty funny though, just to—I don’t think he even noticed that it was out there, and it was like “did he just…?”  Yeah, he just hit one across the street, through a window.  That stands out.

I seem to have been to a lot of games where Top 10 plays happen on SportsCenter.  You were at one where Andrelton Simmons made that sick play against the Mets that we didn’t see because people (standing in the aisle) blocked us.

SOS:  I kind of saw it.  You were a little more blocked.  The best play I’ve ever seen live.

Ryan:  It’s kind of cool, you see it in person and then the next day it’s #1 on SportsCenter.  I was at a Hawks and 76ers game and a dunk made #1 on SportsCenter, and I was sitting right there watching it.  That’s pretty sweet.

Garrett:  The year of the “Kick Six” in the Iron Bowl, we were sitting in a beach house, and the Iron Bowl was taking a little long to finish that year, so we had the Iron Bowl going on here (on one TV), and the Clemson-(South) Carolina game going on here (on another TV).

And I would much rather see us win and Alabama win—I don’t like Alabama, but I’d rather–I’d trade an Alabama win for a Clemson win, if that makes sense—but I was incredibly ecstatic watching, what’s his name, Chris Davis run that kick, that (missed) field goal back for a touchdown, but then my joy quickly turned into despair when Tajh Boyd proceeded to throw like six interceptions.

 

Tomorrow, Fans Week continues with a look at some of the crazy things I’ve ever heard and seen from fans at sporting events. 

Fans Week Roundtable, Part I: Gratifying Wins and Gut-Wrenching Losses

Most of us aren’t members of any team or coaching staff in any pro or college sport, but there is one position we all hold:  fan.

This week, Stiles on Sports will glimpse at the admiration for our favorite teams and players, the exciting wins, and the heartbreaking close calls that are all a part of fanhood.

Welcome to Fans Week.

To start, I talked to three friends (and fellow recent graduates of Anderson University) who are as big of sports fans as I am in a roundtable discussion about their experiences as a fan.

All three have had one or more teams they pull for win championships in recent years, and all have had agonizing near misses too.

Justin Kenley is a St. Louis Cardinals, Carolina Panthers and North Carolina Tar Heels fan.

Ryan Pittman pulls for the Chicago Cubs, Green Bay Packers and South Carolina Gamecocks.

Garrett Black is a Clemson Tigers football fan.  While he only has one team he is a diehard fan of, following that team has been a roller coaster ride over the last few years.

Our conversations covered the full gauntlet of fanhood:  Part I of this two-part roundtable includes discussion on joyous championship occasions and agonizing losses.

 

SOS:  What is your best win as a fan?

Justin:  It’s got to be Game 6 (of the World Series) in 2011.

It was on a Thursday night, and I had a cross country meet Friday morning, and I had to run at 7:30, so we had to be at the meet at 6:15.  Our coach was the kind of guy that you’re in bed by 9:00 on those nights, and I was like, “nah, I can’t go to sleep.”

I was sitting on the edge of our ottoman, and my mom and dad were in there, and I remember thinking we were really done.  And when David Freese hit that triple, I lost my stinking mind.  I just went crazy.  And then, obviously, the next inning, Josh Hamilton hits a home run (for Texas), and then Lance Berkman ties it up again, and then obviously the home run in the 11th.

Honestly, the home run in the 11th, I didn’t freak out nearly as bad as I did for the triple and the single, because it was just the moment, with two strikes, down to your last pitch, but yeah, it’s got to be that.  Game 7 was kind of a letdown too–well, not for me, but as a game.

Ryan:  Probably South Carolina baseball in, I think it would’ve been 2011, they played UConn in the Super Regional, and it was at Carolina Stadium, and I was actually able to go, and I was there when they clinched it to go to Omaha.

As a fan, actually being there for that, seeing the celebration–you know, you watch other teams win on TV and stuff, but actually being there and watching them make the dogpile in the middle, that’s a priceless moment.

And obviously, my greatest sports thing as a fan ever was when the Cubs won the World Series last year.  I’ve never been happier in my life.  I was watching a team that I thought never could win win, and that was pretty spectacular too.

SOS:  Garrett, as a Clemson fan I guess yours is pretty obvious.

Garrett:  Well, let me tell you about a game that happened this past January… (laugh)

SOS:  What was that like as a fan?

Garrett:  I lost my mind.  My younger brother actually took a video of my reaction.  I go in and out of the frame multiple times because I spent the next 30 seconds to a minute just kind of screaming and running around the room.

 

SOS:  What is your worst loss as a fan?

Justin:  I’ve gotta go with the Super Bowl loss…not to the Patriots but to the Broncos.  Villanova (beating North Carolina in 2016) sucked, but just growing up in Charlotte, and loving the Panthers, and just to see the electricity that that team was bringing to Charlotte, and to be on such a roll, and then to just fall short, that hurt.

I was awful mad that night.  Because I had to drive back two-and-a-half hours from my home, because we had a Super Bowl party, and that was not a fun ride back.  Because I still think, and call me a biased fan, but I still think if we play them 10 times, we win seven of them.  I really do think that, especially that year, and they just didn’t play good, so that sucked.  Villanova’s up there, but that one really sucked.

Ryan:  I’ve got to go back to the Packers when they were playing the Seahawks in the NFC Championship Game.

They had the huge lead in the fourth quarter (19-7), and the Seahawks got a miraculous touchdown with like, what was it, 30 seconds or a minute left, and then freaking, was it… Bostick, Brandon Bostick, decided not to block, decided to be a hero and field the onside kick, and he ended up becoming the villain, and the Packers lost that game, which I thought was a game they should have easily won, and been in the Super Bowl that year.  And that was painful.

Garrett:  I’m probably going to have to go with the Orange Bowl loss (to West Virginia in 2012, 70-33).  Just, I remember me and my dad watching it, and I think we were down two or three scores, and we’re like, okay, now’s the time to buckle down and get with it, and I think we allowed another two touchdowns within—I mean, West Virginia was scoring all over the place that game.  So we just turned the TV off, and we didn’t speak for the rest of the night.  It was tough.

 

SOS:  What non-playoff win stands out in your memory?

Justin:  Two years ago, we were playing the Cubs in the regular season, and it was just one of those frustrating nights, the ball didn’t seem to bounce our way, nothing really happened, and then the ninth inning with two outs, Jhonny Peralta hits a line drive over the left-center field wall in Wrigley Field.

And it was just awesome to see Wrigley Field so pumped and excited, and then the air was let out of that place.  And I think if I remember correctly, they went on to win it in the 10th.  Which, it’s kind of funny that that’s a baseball game, because one out of 162, but that one stuck out in my mind.

Another one I remember… I was at Bank of America Stadium the year before we made the big run, and we went 12-4, and it was when we played the Saints, in the monsoon game.  And literally, I was up in the upper deck and couldn’t even see the field, because the rain was so bad.  It was that bad.  But that kind of like Cam (Newton)’s emergence, leading us to a division title and stuff, and that game sealed the NFC South for us.  That was awesome.

Ryan:  This is going to be a little off the grid…

SOS: That’s the point of the question.

Ryan: I think it was two or three years ago, South Carolina basketball was in the SEC Tournament as like a 13-seed, and all of a sudden they won a couple of games and made it to the quarterfinals and lost there.  It wasn’t a great season, but those two wins, I think were against Auburn and another crappy team in the SEC, but it was like—in my opinion those wins were big, because I was like, “hey look, we’re winning in the tournament.” It was symbolic to the fact that it was going to get better.  So at the time, obviously, it’s not a huge deal when a 13-seed beats a 12-seed, or something like that, it’s not a big deal…

SOS: But the next day beat a 5-seed, I think.  I want to say it was Arkansas.

Ryan: Yeah, it’s like wow, here we are, it’s a game that didn’t really matter but it gave me hope as a fan.

Garrett:  When Deshaun (Watson) snapped the losing streak against (South) Carolina, and he was playing on, what, a torn ACL, and it was a home game, in fairness, but five losses in a rivalry that heated, in a row, that was like being able to breathe air again.

 

SOS:  What non-playoff loss stands out, or “still stings”?

Justin:  Any time we lose to Duke, I hate it.  I almost treat the Duke games like playoff games.  And obviously there’s playoff losses that sting, but just regular season games—there’s always a game that where like, “man, we had that.”

I also hated when (the Panthers) lost to Atlanta, when we went 15-1.  That really stung.  Because I really thought, “we’re going to go undefeated this year.”  Only two games away from doing it, and then to win in the fashion we did in Week 17, it would’ve been nice to have won in Week 16.

Ryan:  This is going to go way back.  Wow, it must have been ’03 or ’04.  The Cubs were playing the Brewers at Miller Park.  Craig Counsell hit a leadoff home run, and the Brewers won the game 1-0.

I watched that entire game as a 10-year old, like, come on, come on, let’s get a run, like, can we score a run, because the pitching was great, and that game still stands out, because, like, the first inning home run, you can get so much time to come back, you’ve still got 24 outs to work with, and…. no.  That loss stands out.  It didn’t affect anything, but that’s a non-championship, non-playoff loss that stands out.

Garrett:  The one that’s freshest on my mind is the loss to Pitt this year, because we were the better football team, we were at home, we should’ve won that game.

But we were kind of resting on how good we were supposed to be, and not actually playing to our full potential, and I think had we won that game we wouldn’t have won the national championship.

 

SOS:  Who is one team that didn’t win a championship that you are particularly fond of?

Justin:  I loved the 2013 Cardinals.  I thought that team was loaded.  I still think we were the best team that year.  I loved our bullpen, going seventh, eighth and ninth, with (Kevin) Seagrist, (Carlos) Martinez and (Trevor) Rosenthal; I was like, “man, you get us in the seventh inning with the lead, it’s ballgame.”

I loved that team, and I hate that—I feel like it was one of those things that we just didn’t play well in the World Series, and it happens.  I loved that team, and obviously the Panthers two years ago.  That was a fun team to watch.  Cam (Newton) doing Cam things that we’d never seen before, that was a lot of fun.

But that Cardinal team was good, man.  I remember going into the World Series, and obviously, 2011 was different, because we snuck in to the Wild Card and just got hot at the right time, but 2013 I was like, “man, this is the best team I’ve seen us put together in a while.”  So just, it just kind of sucked to lose it, because I felt like we were so good, but that happens, man—sports.

SOS: Yeah, to win a World Series you’ve got to play well for a whole month.  You have an off week, you’re done.

Justin: It happens.

Ryan:  Does it have to be a team that’s my favorite team?

SOS: Not necessarily.

Ryan:  Because, there’s a handful of those teams that I just… I think the Tampa Bay Rays, back in 2008, when they made the World Series.  It was with their low-payroll, low-everything, no really big superstars, but they found a way to win games, and it was kind of cool to watch that small market team that hadn’t been in the league that long just kind of come out of nowhere with guys that were fun to watch and just enjoying the game.  That’s probably my favorite non-championship team.

I could say the 2015 Cubs, too, (once the rebuilding team was respectable), but there wasn’t that connection yet with those players.  It was still bits and pieces, and like it wasn’t quite there yet.  It was all magical anyway, we shouldn’t have even been in the playoffs that year.

Garrett:  I’d have to give it to the ’15 Tigers, the ones that lost the championship game.  They’re the ones that kind of finally shed the underperforming label, because we could’ve won the ACC as many times as we wanted to and that would always just be “all you can do is win the ACC.”

I remember, like in the 24 hours after we lost that game (to Alabama), I saw probably three or four different think pieces on how much respect people had for Clemson after that game.  It just was like the perception of who Clemson was and what we could accomplish kind of just changed overnight after that game.

 

Tomorrow in Part II, our roundtable will discuss the panelists’ favorite players to watch, who they wish they could’ve watched, and crazy things they’ve done and seen as a fan.

 

Column: Why Road Course Racing Is Good for NASCAR

Sunday marks the first road course race of the 2017 Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series season, as the series takes on the 1.99-mile Sonoma Raceway in the Toyota/Save Mart 350 today at 3 p.m. eastern.

While some fans like road course races and others can’t stand them, the novelty of racing on a non-oval makes road course racing good for NASCAR.

The Cup Series schedule has featured just two road course races since 1988, and never more than three in the modern era (since 1972).  Watkins Glen has hosted the Cup Series since 1986, and Sonoma, the site of today’s event, has since 1989.  This year’s XFinity Series schedule features road course races at Watkins Glen, Mid-Ohio and Road America, while the Camping World Truck Series will run one road course, at Canadian Tire Motorsports Park.

Road course racing offers a change of pace from typical NASCAR events which are often criticized as cars going in circles and making hundreds of consecutive left turns.

The road course events get new competitors involved in NASCAR, as road course specialists known as “road ringers” often run at Sonoma and Watkins Glen.  While no road ringer has won a Cup Series race since Dan Gurney in 1973 and none have even contended for a win in the last decade, any time new drivers get involved, it can’t be a bad thing for the sport, especially when most of these ringers are regulars in other racing series and can provide cross-promotional benefits to both NASCAR and the other series.

The lack of success of the road ringers in recent years is because many NASCAR stars have put more effort into road course preparation in recent years, taking lessons from road racing experts or logging hundreds of laps in simulators in the days and weeks leading up to each road course event.  Road course races have also been won on several occasions by full-time Cup Series drivers with road racing in their background:  Juan Pablo Montoya, A.J. Allmendinger, Marcos Ambrose and Robby Gordon.

Another reason road course racing is good for the sports is because the best drivers, and not just the fastest cars, are the ones who tend to run up front.  More skill is involved in turning both right and left for over ten unique turns per lap than at the typical NASCAR event on a wide, sweeping track with identical turns on each end.

Beyond the driving skill needed to be successful in road course racing, these races have multiple layers of added strategy, which will be even more pronounced in NASCAR’s new “stage racing” format.  Cars can pit without losing a lap, so each team will try to pick the most optimal times for them to pit to give them the best track position at the end of the race.  Oval-track races often see everyone on the same pit cycle and strategy, but the 38 cars in today’s race could easily use at least a half-dozen different strategies during the race.

The Cup Series schedule will add a third road course race in 2018, as the fall race at Charlotte Motor Speedway will be run on a “roval” combination of the oval and the infield road course.  This will add a road course race to NASCAR’s playoffs (formerly “The Chase”), adding a new element to the 10-race sequence that determines the season champion as a potential “wild card” in the third and final race of the playoffs’ first round.

But we don’t have to wait until 2018 for a thrilling road course event–that will come today, as every time NASCAR turns left and right, the skill and strategy it takes to win and the uniqueness of the venue creates excitement for the fans.

 

 

Toyota/Save Mart 350
Sunday, 3 p.m. ET, FOX Sports 1
Lineup:
Row 1:  Kyle Larson, Jamie McMurray
Row 2:  Martin Truex Jr., Kyle Busch

Row 3:  A.J. Allmendinger, Danica Patrick
Row 4:  Ryan Blaney, Chase Elliott
Row 5:  Chris Buescher, Dale Earnhardt Jr.
Row 6:  Daniel Suarez, Kevin Harvick
Row 7:  Clint Bowyer, Denny Hamlin
Row 8:  Paul Menard, Michael McDowell
Row 9:  Kurt Busch, Joey Logano
Row 10:  Austin Dillon, Ryan Newman
Row 11:  Kasey Kahne, Ricky Stenhouse Jr.
Row 12:  Brad Keselowski, Jimmie Johnson
Row 13:  Trevor Bayne, Billy Johnson
Row 14:  Matt DiBenedetto, David Ragan
Row 15:  Cole Whitt, Erik Jones
Row 16:  Landon Cassill, Alon Day
Row 17:  Josh Bilicki, Boris Said
Row 18:  Ty Dillon, Kevin O’Connell
Row 19:  Tommy Regan, Matt Kenseth

 

Toyota/Save Mart 350 Winners
1989 Ricky Rudd

1990 Rusty Wallace
1991 Davey Allison
1992 Ernie Irvan
1993 Geoffrey Bodine
1994 Ernie Irvan
1995 Dale Earnhardt
1996 Rusty Wallace
1997 Mark Martin
1998 Jeff Gordon
1999 Jeff Gordon
2000 Jeff Gordon
2001 Tony Stewart
2002 Ricky Rudd
2003 Robby Gordon
2004 Jeff Gordon
2005 Tony Stewart
2006 Jeff Gordon
2007 Juan Pablo Montoya
2008 Kyle Busch
2009 Kasey Kahne
2010 Jimmie Johnson
2011 Kurt Busch
2012 Clint Bowyer
2013 Martin Truex Jr.
2014 Carl Edwards
2015 Kyle Busch
2016 Tony Stewart

Column: Fowler Shadowing Mickelson In More Ways Than One

Since Rickie Fowler joined the PGA Tour in 2010, he and Phil Mickelson have become friends, despite their age difference.

Fowler, 28, and Mickelson, 47, often play practice rounds together at Tour events, and have played together as partners in the 2010 and 2016 Ryder Cups.

Rickie Fowler (Chris Breikss/Flickr)

But as Fowler has shadowed Mickelson personally through his young career, he’s also done it professionally, as his career on the course is on a similar path to Mickelson’s.

Fowler opened this weekend’s U.S. Open as the first round leader with a 7-under 65 and was never out of contention until very late Sunday, but after tying for fifth behind winner Brooks Koepka remains the “best player without a major,” a title once held by Mickelson for a significant portion of his career.

The similarities between the career arcs of Fowler and Mickelson started early:  Both qualified for multiple major championships as amateurs, with Mickelson winning low amateur honors at two U.S. Opens and the 1991 Masters, and Fowler making the cut at the 2008 U.S. Open.

While Fowler did not win a PGA Tour event as an amateur like Mickelson did (Mickelson’s win at the 1991 Northern Telecom Open is the last PGA Tour win by an amateur), Fowler won both the prestigious Ben Hogan Award as the nation’s top collegiate golfer in 2008 and PGA Tour Rookie of the Year in 2010, both of which Mickelson never accomplished.

Fowler and Mickelson are both perennial members of the U.S. team in Ryder/President’s Cups:  Mickelson has been on every U.S. team since the 1994 President’s Cup, while Fowler has appeared in three Ryder Cups and one President’s Cup, and in 2010 became the youngest player in U.S. Ryder Cup history at the time (21 years, 9 months; the record has since been broken by Jordan Spieth)

Phil Mickelson (center left) and Rickie Fowler (center right) play a practice round with Brandt Snedeker (left) and Dustin Johnson (right) at the 2015 Masters. (Shannon McGee/Flickr)

Mickelson’s began his career with 22 PGA Tour wins before his first major, the 2004 Masters, which he won at age 33 after playing several years with the dreaded “best player without a major” label that Fowler, with four PGA Tour wins and three more worldwide, currently bears.

Fowler is currently five years younger than Mickelson was when he broke through at Augusta, and actually has more top fives in majors–Sunday was his sixth–than Mickelson did at the same age of 28, when he had four.  Fowler also has two major runner-ups (the 2014 U.S. Open and Open Championship), while Mickelson’s best finish at the same age was a pair of thirds (1994 PGA Championship and 1996 Masters), before his first runner-up in the 1999 U.S. Open, four days after his 29th birthday.

Like Mickelson, who has suffered from the fate of being born within five years of Tiger Woods as well as losing majors to multiple major winners like Nick Price, Nick Faldo and Payne Stewart, Fowler’s near-misses have come at the hands of many of today’s best, notably falling to Martin Kaymer’s dominant U.S. Open performance in 2014 and to Rory McIlroy in back-to-back majors later that summer.

This comparison is good news for Fowler–Mickelson has gone on to win five major championships between 2004-13, and is only a U.S. Open title away from completing the career grand slam, something only five players have accomplished.

Many players, including Mickelson, have endured several near-misses in majors before finally breaking through for their first major title.  Just in this century, in addition to Mickelson, David Duval, Jim Furyk, Padraig Harrington, Stewart Cink, Darren Clarke, Justin Rose, Adam Scott, Dustin Johnson, Henrik Stenson and Sergio Garcia all had multiple close calls in majors before hoisting a major championship trophy.

All of these players were among the best in the world at various points of the pre-major-champion stage of their careers, and all except Duval, who was 29, had to wait until their 30s to taste major glory.

Even Brooks Koepka, who is 27, has had two top five finishes in majors before Sunday’s impressive stretch run earned him his first major.

It took a while–two and a half seasons–for Fowler to get his first PGA Tour win (the 2012 Wells Fargo Championship), and another three years to get his second, which came at the 2015 Players Championship, the unofficial “fifth major” (which Mickelson never won until 2007), so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Fowler, who is still young, hasn’t won a major just yet.

As Fowler and his throngs of fans patiently await his first major, the assertion of some that he doesn’t have what it takes or that he won’t win a major because he hasn’t by age 28 is simply unreasonable.

Fowler failing to win a major to this point isn’t grim.  It’s normal.

And he’s just following in the footsteps of a friend.

117th U.S. Open

Leaders:
1. Brooks Koepka, U.S., -16 (67-70-68-67–272), ties Rory McIlroy (2011) for lowest score in relation to par in U.S. Open history
T2. Hideki Matsuyama, Japan, -12 (74-65-71-66–276)
T2. Brian Harman, U.S., -12 (67-60-67-72–276)
4. Tommy Fleetwood, England, -11 (67-70-68-72–277)
T5. Xander Schauffele, U.S., -10 (66-73-70-69–278)
T5. Bill Haas, U.S., 10 (72-68-69-69–278)
T5. Rickie Fowler, U.S., -10 (65-73-68-72–278)
8. Charley Hoffman, U.S., -9 (70-70-68-71–279)
T9. Trey Mullinax, U.S., -8 (71-72-69-68–280)
T9. Brandt Snedeker, U.S., -8 (70-69-70-71–280)
T9. Justin Thomas, U.S., -8 (73-69-63-75–280), became fifth player in U.S. Open history to shoot 63 (third round)

Notables:
T21. Sergio Garcia, Spain, -4 (70-71-71-72–284), highest-finishing former major champion
T27. Scottie Scheffler, U.S., -1 (69-74-71-73–287), low amateur
T35. Jordan Spieth, U.S.,  +1 (73-71-76-69–289)
Justin Rose (+2), Dustin Johnson (+4), Rory McIlroy (+5) and Jason Day (+10) missed the cut.
Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods did not play.

Fast Five: Storylines Entering the 117th U.S. Open

The second major of the 2017 golf season, the U.S. Open, begins tomorrow morning at Erin Hills in Wisconsin.

156 players will tee it up in “golf’s toughest test,” each with the hope of hoisting one of golf’s oldest trophies on Sunday evening.

Here are the biggest storylines entering the 117th edition of the U.S. Open:

Erin Hills

The venue for this year’s U.S. Open is hosting the event for the first time.  The course, designed by Dr. Michael John Hurdzan, Dana Fry and Ron Whitten, is carved from the rolling Midwestern hills 25 miles northwest of Milwaukee, and with ragged bunkering and thick fescue rough looks as much like Ireland as Wisconsin.

Erin Hills, the fifth public course to host the U.S. Open (all since 2002), hosted the 2011 U.S. Amateur, won by Kelly Kraft (who failed to qualify for this year’s U.S. Open), just after the course opened in 2006.  The par-72 layout–the first par-72 for a U.S. Open since 1992–stretches 7,741 yards, the longest course in major championship history.  Add to that the distance between some of the holes, and players will be in for a long walk over the next four days.  The course’s length could potentially play into the hands of the big hitters throughout the week, although a case could be made that the thick rough would work against them.

This U.S. Open marks the first in the state of Wisconsin, and the state’s fifth major championship (1933, 2004, 2010, 2015 PGA); Wisconsin native and former U.S. Amateur Public Links champion Jordan Niebrugge will strike the first tee shot of the event tomorrow at 6:45 a.m. local time, while fellow Wisconsin native Steve Stricker headlines the group of 78 who reached the U.S. Open through qualifying (from a field of 8,979 players).

The Weather

A big part of course conditions in any golf tournament is the weather.  Temperatures will stay in the mid-80s through the week until Sunday, with a forecast high of 77.  Thursday and Sunday look the best regarding potential precipitation, with 10 and 20 percent chances of rain, respectively.  Friday and Saturday, meanwhile, have more threatening forecasts, with a 50 percent chance of rain Friday and an 80 percent chance Saturday.  Winds will mainly come from the west, and will stay around 10 MPH until Sunday, when they are forecast to strengthen to 18 MPH.

The weather would be a big story regardless, but because of one star player’s unique circumstances, it could become and even bigger story on Thursday with a surprise rain storm…

Phil Mickelson

…because five-time major winner Phil Mickelson needs such a surprise rain storm to stay in the field.

Mickelson–who at 46 needs only the U.S. Open title to become just the sixth player to complete the career Grand Slam–is attending his daughter’s high school graduation in California, at 12 p.m. CT.  His scheduled tee time at Erin Hills is very late, at 2:20 pm CT, but still won’t be late enough for Mickelson to make it to Erin Hills unless the tournament’s first round is significantly delayed by weather.

Given the above forecast, such a delay is unlikely, meaning Mickelson would have to withdraw from the tournament.

18 years ago Mickelson was prepared to withdraw from the 1999 U.S. Open in the event wife Amy went into labor for the birth of Amanda, who was born the morning after the tournament ended (just as a playoff against Payne Stewart would have hypothetically started had Stewart not defeated Mickelson by one shot in regulation).  18 years later Mickelson will, in all likelihood, miss a chance to complete the career Grand Slam as he attends Amanda’s graduation, where she will be giving a valedictory address.

Mickelson has not yet officially withdrawn, holding out hope for an unlikely delay, and the USGA says he can withdraw at any time before his tee time on Thursday.  His place in the field would be filled by an alternate; the first alternate is currently Roberto Diaz.

UPDATE:  Mickelson officially withdrew at about 10 a.m. local time on Thursday, making this U.S. Open the first major championship without Mickelson or Tiger Woods in the field since the 1994 Masters.

Dustin Johnson

The defending winner of the U.S. Open after last year’s triumph at Oakmont, Johnson enters this year’s edition as the 7-1 favorite.  Johnson has five PGA Tour wins since last year’s triumph, which was his first major title, and is the top-ranked player in the world, with as large a lead over second-ranked Jason Day as Day has over 38th-ranked Brandt Snedeker.

Last year’s win came after a controversial delayed ruling by the USGA left Johnson’s exact score in question as the back nine of the final round played out, with a review pending that could (and eventually would) penalize Johnson one stroke for his ball moving on the fifth green after he addressed the ball.  For this year’s U.S. Open, the USGA has added four on-course video review booths to allow for in-round rules decisions to be made more efficiently.

Johnson is trying to become the first U.S. Open winner to go back-to-back since Curtis Strange in 1988-89.  Golf may not have Johnson’s undivided attention this week, as he and fiance Paulina Gretzky had their second child on Monday, but some players have won major championships under similar circumstances (including Danny Willett at the 2016 Masters and Bubba Watson at the 2013 Masters).

Johnson may also have some subtle form of redemption on his mind; he was the heavy favorite entering the Masters, but withdrew with a back injury after falling down the stairs of his rental home.

 

Other Contenders 

Beyond the top-ranked Johnson, three other superstars are among the favorites every time they tee it up:  Jordan Spieth (9-1), Rory McIlroy (10-1) and Jason Day (11-1).  Since the start of 2013, Spieth and McIlroy both have 58 major championship rounds, totaling 4,108 strokes and an 18-under par score, with both winning two majors including a U.S. Open.  In the same span, Day is -43 in major championship play, 10 shots better than anyone else.

However, six straight majors have been won by a first-time major champion, and the first and second round grouping of Rickie Fowler, Hideki Matsuyama and Jon Rahm could extend that streak to seven.  Fowler (18-1) has a win and six top six finishes in 2017, including a tie for second two weeks ago at The Memorial, while Matsuyama (28-1) is ranked fourth in the world, and Rahm (18-1) has eight top five finishes since the day he turned pro last year, which is tied for the most on the PGA Tour in that span.

Sergio Garcia (28-1) and Justin Rose (20-1) are also potential contenders after their epic back nine duel at The Masters.  Garcia, who won that Masters duel for his first major title, has five career top 10s in the U.S. Open including a fifth last year, while Rose won the 2013 U.S. Open at Merion.

 

 

 

117th U.S. OPEN

Notable First Round Tee Times (ET)

8:51 a.m.:  Hideki Matsuyama, Rickie Fowler, Jon Rahm
9:13 a.m.:  Danny Willett, Zach Johnson, Angel Cabrera
9:24 a.m.:  Matt Kuchar, Francesco Molinari, Patrick Reed
9:35 a.m.:  Martin Kaymer, Jordan Spieth, Dustin Johnson
2:36 p.m.:  Bubba Watson, Adam Scott, Sergio Garcia
2:47 p.m.:  Henrik Stenson, Charl Schwartzel, Louis Oosthuizen
2:58 p.m.:  Jimmy Walker, Justin Thomas, Paul Casey

3:09 p.m.:  Jason Day, Justin Rose, Rory McIlroy
3:20 p.m.:  Steve Stricker, Stewart Cink, Phil Mickelson

U.S. Open Champions
(Year, Champion, Nationality, Host Course)
1895 Horace Rawlins, England, Newport
1896 James Foulis, Scotland, Shinnecock Hills

1897 Joe Lloyd, England, Chicago G.C.
1898 Fred Herd, Scotland, Myopia Hunt
1899 Willie Smith, Scotland, Baltimore C.C. 
1900 Harry Vardon, Jersey, Chicago G.C.
1901 Willie Anderson, Scotland, Myopia Hunt
1902 Laurie Auchterlonie, Scotland, Garden City G.C.
1903 Willie Anderson, Scotland, Baltusrol
1904 Willie Anderson, Scotland, Glen View
1905 Willie Anderson, Scotland, Myopia Hunt
1906 Alex Smith, Scotland, Onwentsia
1907 Alec Ross, Scotland, Philadelphia Cricket Club
1908 Fred McLeod, Scotland, Myopia Hunt
1909 George Sargent, England, Englewood
1910 Alex Smith, Scotland, Philadelpia Cricket Club
1911 John McDermott, U.S., Chicago G.C.
1912 John McDermott, U.S., C.C. of Buffalo
1913 Francis Ouimet, U.S., The Country Club
1914 Walter Hagen, U.S., Midlothian
1915 Jerome Travers, U.S., Baltusrol
1916 Chick Evans, U.S., The Minikahda Club
1917-18 No tournament due to World War I
1919 Walter Hagen, U.S., Brae Burn
1920 Ted Ray, Jersey, Inverness
1921 Jim Barnes, England, Columbia C.C.
1922 Gene Sarazen, U.S., Skokie 
1923 Bobby Jones, U.S., Inwood
1924 Cyril Walker, England, Oakland Hills
1925 Willie Macfarlane, Scotland, Worcester C.C.
1926 Bobby Jones, U.S., Scioto
1927 Tommy Armour, U.S., Oakmont
1928 Johnny Farrell, U.S., Olympia Fields
1929 Bobby Jones, U.S., Winged Foot
1930 Bobby Jones, U.S., Interlachen
1931 Billy Burke, U.S., Inverness
1932 Gene Sarazen, U.S., Fresh Meadow
1933 Johnny Goodman, U.S., North Shore
1934 Olin Dutra, U.S., Merion
1935 Sam Parks Jr., U.S., Oakmont
1936 Tony Manero, U.S., Baltusrol
1937 Ralph Guldahl, U.S., Oakland Hills
1938 Ralph Guldahl, U.S., Cherry Hills
1939 Byron Nelson, U.S., Philadelphia C.C. 
1940 Lawson Little, U.S., Canterbury
1941 Craig Wood, U.S., Colonial
1942-45 No tournament due to World War II
1946 Lloyd Mangrum, U.S., Canterbury
1947 Lew Worsham, U.S., St. Louis C.C.
1948 Ben Hogan, U.S., Riviera
1949 Cary Middlecoff, U.S., Medinah
1950 Ben Hogan, U.S., Merion
1951 Ben Hogan, U.S., Oakland Hills
1952 Julius Boros, U.S., Northwood
1953 Ben Hogan, U.S., Oakmont
1954 Ed Furgol, U.S., Baltusrol
1955 Jack Fleck, U.S., Olympic
1956 Cary Middlecoff, U.S., Oak Hill
1957 Dick Mayer, U.S., Inverness
1958 Tommy Bolt, U.S., Southern Hills 
1959 Billy Casper, U.S., Winged Foot
1960 Arnold Palmer, U.S., Cherry Hills
1961 Gene Littler, U.S., Oakland Hills
1962 Jack Nicklaus, U.S., Oakmont
1963 Julius Boros, U.S., The Country Club
1964 Ken Venturi, U.S., Congressional
1965 Gary Player, South Africa, Bellerive
1966 Billy Casper, U.S., Olympic
1967 Jack Nicklaus, U.S., Baltusrol
1968 Lee Trevino, U.S., Oak Hill
1969 Orville Moody, U.S., Champions
1970 Tony Jacklin, England, Hazeltine
1971 Lee Trevino, U.S., Merion
1972 Jack Nicklaus, U.S., Pebble Beach
1973 Johnny Miller, U.S., Oakmont
1974 Hale Irwin, U.S., Winged Foot
1975 Lou Graham, U.S., Medinah
1976 Jerry Pate, U.S., Atlanta Athletic Club
1977 Hubert Green, U.S., Southern Hills
1978 Andy North, U.S., Cherry Hills
1979 Hale Irwin, U.S., Inverness
1980 Jack Nicklaus, U.S., Baltusrol
1981 David Graham, Australia, Merion
1982 Tom Watson, U.S., Pebble Beach
1983 Larry Nelson, U.S., Oakmont
1984 Fuzzy Zoeller, U.S., Winged Foot
1985 Andy North, U.S., Oakland Hills
1986 Raymond Floyd, U.S., Shinnecock Hills
1987 Scott Simpson, U.S., Olympic
1988 Curtis Strange, U.S., The Country Club
1989 Curtis Strange, U.S., Oak Hill
1990 Hale Irwin, U.S., Medinah
1991 Payne Stewart, U.S., Hazeltine
1992 Tom Kite, U.S., Pebble Beach
1993 Lee Janzen, U.S., Baltusrol
1994 Ernie Els, South Africa, Congressional
1995 Corey Pavin, U.S., Shinnecock Hills
1996 Steve Jones, U.S., Oakland Hills
1997 Ernie Els, U.S., Congressional
1998 Lee Janzen, U.S., Olympic
1999 Payne Stewart, U.S., Pinehurst No. 2
2000 Tiger Woods, U.S., Pebble Beach
2001 Retief Goosen, South Africa, Southern Hills
2002 Tiger Woods, U.S., Bethpage Black
2003 Jim Furyk, U.S., Olympia Fields
2004 Retief Goosen, South Africa, Shinnecock Hills
2005 Michael Campbell, New Zealand, Pinehurst No. 2
2006 Geoff Ogilvy, Australia, Winged Foot
2007 Angel Cabrera, Argentina, Oakmont
2008 Tiger Woods, U.S., Torrey Pines
2009 Lucas Glover, U.S., Bethpage Black
2010 Graeme McDowell, Northern Ireland, Pebble Beach
2011 Rory McIlroy, Northern Ireland, Congressional
2012 Webb Simpson, U.S., Olympic
2013 Justin Rose, England, Merion
2014 Martin Kaymer, Germany, Pinehurst No. 2
2015 Jordan Spieth, U.S., Chambers Bay
2016 Dustin Johnson, U.S., Oakmont
Future Sites
2017 Erin Hills (Erin, Wis.)
2018 Shinnecock Hills (Shinnecock Hills, N.Y.)
2019 Pebble Beach (Pebble Beach, Calif.)
2020 Winged Foot (Mamaroneck, N.Y.)
2021 Torrey Pines (La Jolla, Calif.)
2022 The Country Club (Brookline, Mass.)
2023 Los Angeles C.C. (Los Angeles, Calif.)
2024 Pinehurst No. 2 (Pinehurst, N.C.)
2025 Oakmont (Oakmont, Penn.)
2026 Shinnecock Hills (Shinnecock Hills, N.Y.)

Mein Deutschland und Schweiz Journal (My Germany and Switzerland Journal)

I recently had the opportunity to travel to Germany and Switzerland with a group from Anderson University.

After an incredible trip, I have enjoyed sharing about my experience with people back in the U.S. over the last few days.

Below is the journal I kept throughout the trip, chronicling our activities from each day, along with some of the pictures I took along the way.

 

Sunday May 14-Monday, May 15

May 14-15 really just felt like one really long day with a nap.  After starting May 14 in an Anderson hotel after graduating the previous day, my parents and I went to Atlanta for my 10:15 pm flight from Hartsfield-Jackson.

We were at the airport about 7 pm, and I was at the gate by about 8, although I did have to go through security twice—I didn’t empty my pockets the first time.  In talking with the agent, I made an unintended pun: “I’ve never flown before, so I’m learning on the fly.”

I started the flight from Atlanta to London by watching the flight tracker on the in-flight entertainment screen.  I know flying is very fast, but I got a tangible example as we crossed South Carolina (from just south of Anderson to around Rock Hill) in about 15 minutes.  I didn’t sleep much while watching some of the in-flight entertainment, and actually dozed off on approach to London Heathrow and was woken up by the feeling of the landing.  I slept for most of the London-to-Berlin flight, which was roughly an hour and a half.

Brandenberg Gate

Leaving the airport in Berlin, our group had an interesting moment when not everyone got on the same bus, and one group—the one I was in—had neither professor.  Through cell phones, we figured out where to get off the bus.

Our hotel is nice, and very close to the city center, and most of our attractions for the next couple of days are within walking distance.  Dr. Duncan told us it was built for when the World Cup was here (2006).

After dinner tonight, we walked back to the hotel, passing the Brandenburg Gate and Reichstag, among other notable landmarks.  These old structures lit up at night is really cool.

Tuesday, May 16

Our first full day in Berlin was a full day, for sure.

Berlin Wall Memorial

We began with a guided tour of the Berlin Wall Memorial.  There stands one of the only sections left of the wall itself, plus vertical steel beams marking more of where the wall stood.  I never realized 139 people were killed as a result of the Berlin Wall.  There is also a chapel there where a church once stood that was torn down during the Wall era, and the outline of the church foundation is still there.  Behind the chapel, we walked through a cemetery, where all the graves are from since 1985 except the ones that have been restored.

At the Berlin Wall gift shop, they sell pieces of the wall for a remarkably cheap price: 4,50 Euros for a piece of history.  I guess they’re that cheap only because there’s a lot of pieces, since the wall was around 100 miles long.

After the wall and lunch, we walked by Reichstag and the Brandenburg Gate in daylight, then walked to the Holocaust Museum.  It was an interesting juxtaposition to have World War II (Holocaust) and the after effects of it (Berlin Wall) back-to-back.  Germany has certainly not hidden its worst history, and does quite a job of preserving it.  In the Holocaust Museum, there are displays of letters and diary excerpts from Holocaust victims, and the stories of numerous families, all of which had none or few survivors.  This really humanized the tragedy; it is often a challenge finding individual stories when appr. 6 million Jews (and up to 11 million altogether) were killed.

Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church

Just a couple blocks from there, ironically, is Hitler’s Fuhrerbunker.  Now, it is just a parking lot surrounded by apartment buildings, because the German government doesn’t want any kind of memorial or acknowledgement there, for obvious reasons.  There is a historical marker, kind of like the ones on streets in the U.S. but a little bigger and more thorough, in both German and English.

After Fuhrerbunker we passed the site of Hitler’s pre-bunker home (once again, now built over) on the way to the bus stop.  We rode to Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Church, which was bombed in World War II and only partially restored.

After dinner, we rode the bus (a double-decker) out to a more suburban part of town to walk thorugh a neighborhood and find Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s home.

The streets here aren’t as busy as I expected, although it’s partially because many people use public transportation.  As a result, train stations (the one at central city) look like shopping malls.  The trams that ride the lanes of the street while attached to cables above are really cool.

Wednesday, May 17

Checkpoint Charlie

We spent this morning at “The Luther Effect” exhibit at a big museum downtown.  The exhibit featured artifacts from the Reformation in Germany, and other parts of Europe, but also the “effect” of the Reformation and the Protestant Church in Sweden, Tanzania, South Korea, and the U.S.  The U.S. portion included quotes from many well-known Americans, including Abraham Lincoln and Susan B. Anthony, on Protestantism.

After lunch at the massive Mall of Berlin food court, we went to Checkpoint Charlie, the former gate/entryway between East Berlin and the American sector of West Berlin.

From there, we visited the Topography of Terror.  This museum is at the location of the Nazi SS Police building, some of the foundation of which still stands.  This museum included information about the Nazi’s rise to power and persecution of the Jews and others.  There was also a temporary exhibit on the

connection of Martin Luther’s anti-Semitic writing and his 450th birthday in 1933 to the rise of anti-Semitism in the Nazi regime.  The location of the Topography of Terror also includes another still-standing portion of the Berlin Wall.

I have never been to a city where the people are surrounded by history in their day-to-day lives like they are here.  It seems at every turn there is a historical landmark, or that something happened in that location.  That said, I’m also looking forward to seeing small-town Germany (I can relate to it more) as we visit Wittenberg tomorrow (although it certainly also has many historical landmarks and events).

Castle Church

Thursday, May 18

Today we took a 45-minute train ride to Wittenberg, the home of Martin Luther for most of his adult life.  Wittenberg is completely different from Berlin.  While Berlin has kind of felt like an American-style city with a European flavor, Wittenberg was a look into small-town and historic Germany.  The streets in the downtown area are cobblestone and virtually everyone walks or rides a bike.

We saw the Castle Church, where Luther posted the 95 Theses (1517) and is buried.  The door (although not the actual door; it was burned down in the 18th century) is a great photo-op.  We got a guided tour through town, by the City Church where Luther preached, the University of Wittenberg, and the homes of Luther, Phillip Melancthon (university professor and fellow reformer alongside Luther), and Lucas Cranach (artist and Luther’s friend who painted him many times).  We toured the inside Lutherhaus and Melancthonhaus; Luther’s home included many of his writings and some printed Bibles, while Melancthon’s included the original Augsburg Confession.

The location at Castle Church where Martin Luther posted his 95 Theses in 1517

After the tour, we went back to Castle Church for an English-speaking service.  Afterwards, we looked at the altar area, which includes some incredible architecture and the grave marker for Luther.  There was some discussion in the group as to whether that’s his literal gravesite or if it’s just somewhere on the church grounds.

Between seeing the historic sites pertaining to Luther, and doing so in a charming small town like Wittenberg, this was probably my favorite day of the trip so far.

Castle Church interior

Stained glass at Castle Church

Martin Luther’s grave marker

City Church, Wittenberg

City Church interior

Friday, May 19

Tiergarten and the Berlin skyline, as seen from Reichstag Dome

Today began at a Starbucks, right in the shadow of the Brandenburg Gate.  I’m not a coffee person, but Dr. Neal suggested to another student who doesn’t like coffee to try a mocha, so I had an iced mocha and liked it.  It was an early morning, so I knew coffee would help with energy for the day.

After breakfast, we went to the Reichstag Dome.  This is the glass dome on top of the Reichstag (Germany’s Parliament building), which provides great views of the city in all directions.  It also has an exhibit on the history of the Reichstag.

We took an almost two-hour train ride to Erfurt at midday.  The train rides in rural Germany provide a neat glimpse of the countryside.  Many of the towns are very small and compact, and some are even just the area of two or three football fields in total.  A lot of these don’t even have a train stop.

Erfurt is a larger, more modern version of Wittenberg in some ways.  There are many churches here, all aesthetically pleasing.  200,000 live here, but it still has an intimate feel.

Augustinian Monastery, Erfurt

This afternoon we toured the Augustinian Monastery.  Luther lived there as a monk before moving to Wittenberg.  Seeing and hearing about the lived led by the monks was very interesting, and I had been looking forward to this site after writing a paper on it.

We continued through the tour through more of Erfurt, seeing old homes and churches, as well as the buildings where Luther studied at the University of Erfurt.  It rained, with some thunder and lightning, through this part of the tour.  We ended at a massive and beautiful cathedral, where Luther was ordained.

A cell at the Augustinian Monastery

Erfurt Cathedral

Saturday, May 20

St. George’s Church in Eisenach, where Bach attended

Today was a long and crazy day.

We began with laundry in Erfurt, which was crazy in itself (picture 16 Americans in Europe at a laundromat).  As a result of that, we missed our train to Eisenach, although we simply ate lunch in Erfurt and caught another train an hour later.

In Eisenach, the streets are cobblestones, all the buildings are old, and there are many old churches.  One of these is the church Johann Sebastian Bach attended, and Luther briefly did as well.

From the area of Bach’s church, we hiked up a mountain to go to Wartburg Castle.  It was a solid three-fourths of a mile, at least, and mostly straight uphill.  I had not listened to Dr. Duncan and Dr. Neal and didn’t have water for the hike.  There was a bratwurst stand halfway up, where I got “medium” water, halfway between sparkling water, which is popular here, and “still water.”

This hike was totally worth it, because the castle is absolutely phenomenal.  It dates back over 700 years and has lots of history, including Martin Luther using it as a hideout after his conflicts with the Catholic Church.  This year

Wartburg Castle, Eisenach

the castle is the third site of the national Luther exhibit for the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, after the two we saw in Berlin and Wittenberg.

After hiking back down, dinner took a while but was quite interesting.  It was a restaurant where everyone gets the same meal, cooked as if from the Reformation era, and served by waiters dressed like Luther.  It started with bread, then beef soup, then some vegetables, then the main course of bratwurst and a meat and vegetable roast.  Dessert was what I can only describe as “flaming fruit.”  Due to the length of dinner we missed our original train, then had to run about a half-mile to make sure we caught one back to Erfurt.

Looking back to Eisenach from Wartburg Castle

Sunday, May 21

This morning we went from Erfurt to Mainz by train.  On the ride, we passed through Frankfurt, and saw some distant mountains.

Once we were in Mainz, we met with the chaplain from a Christian student group at the University of Mainz.  He showed us their student housing building, and their church building where students meet to worship.

From there, we visited the Gutenberg Museum.  We saw demonstrations of how Gutenberg’s pages were printed, and saw some of the original Gutenberg bibles.  The museum had a lot of stuff about various forms of printing, including the history of the newspaper, although many of the exhibits did not have English on the information plaques (most places throughout the trip have had German on the top or left and English on the bottom or right).  The museum sells replicas of different pages of the Gutenberg bible—I got Genesis 1 and John 1—as well as replicas of the letters used in his movable type printing.

From the museum, some of us went down the couple of blocks to the Rhine River for a few minutes, then walked back up to near the museum to Mainz Cathedral.  This cathedral was, as many are here, quite beautiful.  Many archbishops are buried there.

Today was a day for Italian food in Germany—I had pizza for lunch (at a shop in the train station), and lasagna for dinner (at an Italian restaurant).

Tonight is our last night in Germany, before we cross the Swiss border tomorrow.

Monday, May 22

Grossmunster Church, Zurich

This morning, we rode a train to Worms for breakfast.  After breakfast we walked a short distance to the location of Luther’s Diet of Worms speech—the building no longer stands in is a courtyard, although the church itself is still there (a Catholic church).  We also passed a beautiful and elaborate Reformation monument with statues of Luther, Melancthon and others.

We got back on the train to go to Zurich, arriving mid-afternoon.  We rode through some low mountains, a nice prelude to tomorrow’s Alps trains.  We crossed the Swiss border at Basel.

Zurich is kind of a high-class city.  Things are more expensive, and there are fashion stores and really nice cars around every corner.

We toured the Grossmunster Church, where Ulrich Zwingli started the Reformation in Switzerland—our tour guide explained to us that although John Calvin in Geneva was sooner, Geneva was not yet a

The view of Zurich from the tower at Grossmunster Church

part of Switzerland at that time.

The church is beautiful, as many of them are here.  After touring the main part of the cathedral, as well as the crypt and a chapel and a pastor’s study, we got to go up a lot of stairs to one of the church’s two towers.  The view from there of the city, Lake Zurich, and the Alps in the distance (with snow on the tops in May!) was amazing.

We had a unique dinner at a cafeteria on the top floor of a department store, which Dr. Duncan said was because things are so expensive in Zurich.  We walked back to the hotel down Bahnhafstrasse, one of the main streets of Zurich.  I am writing this from our hotel balcony, which is adjacent to the back of a church, and has a partial view of the distant skyline.

The view of Zurich, Lake Zurich, and the distant Alps from Grossmunster Church in Zurich

Tuesday, May 23

Today we traveled by train from Zurich to Geneva, passing through the Alps.  This part of the world is so beautiful, and words don’t do it justice.  The mountain tops had snow, even with the temperature at “ground level” above 70.  These mountains are all very steep, and most are untouched at the top.  The rivers and lakes in the valleys only added to the views we experienced.

The Swiss Alps

One of our stops was in Montreux, We walked down to the bank of Lake Geneva, with the Alps and the Swiss/French border looming across the lake.  From there, our last train was from Montreux to Geneva, and was mainly along the lakeshore.

Geneva itself is the busiest city we’ve been in on the trip, or at least it seems that way.  Our hotel is tucked in the top few floors of a building, the rest of which is office space.  I don’t know what New York feels like, but I imagine it to be kind of like this.

After dinner, we walked by the (unlit) Reformation Wall, then by St. Pierre’s Cathedral.  The church is beautiful at night, and we’ll tour the inside tomorrow.

The Swiss Alps; notice the waterfall in the center

The Swiss Alps

The Swiss Alps

Wednesday, May 24

St. Pierre’s Cathedral, Geneva

We began our first full day in Geneva with breakfast in our hotel rooms (croissant, wheat roll, orange juice, and hot chocolate).  We then walked to the Reformation Wall, then to St. Pierre’s Cathedral.  This church had someone playing the organ (it sounded like they were just practicing), and it made the atmosphere more authentic.  We climbed to the top of the two towers and got great panoramic views of the city.

From there, we split into smaller groups.  We have a “Geneva Pass” which gets us free entry into most of the landmarks and attractions.  Three of us ate lunch at McDonald’s—I’d honestly wanted to see what American fast food was like over here—and I got a “cheeseburger royal,” which sounded different but was just a regular burger with some kind of extra sauce.

We then walked to the Modern and Contemporary Art Museum (that was an experience—some very different and unique artwork).  The whole group came back together for a lake cruise, which lasted about an hour.

Our small group then stopped at Starbucks (iced mocha for me again) and Coop, a store that is a mix of a department store and supermarket, strung out over several floors of a city building, before eating dinner.

Geneva and Lake Geneva from the tower at St. Pierre’s Cathedral

The Reformation Wall, Geneva

Thursday, May 25

The Mont Saleve cable car

Today was Ascension Day in the European Church, a holiday which marks the ascension of Christ on the 40th day after Easter.  Because of the holiday, some of the tourist attractions in Geneva were closed.

We did still get to go just over the border into France, just outside the city, and ride a cable car up Mont Saleve.  The cable car ride was less nerve-wracking than I thought it would be, and the view of the city and Lake Geneva, as well as the surrounding mountains, was amazing.  We spent a couple ours at the top, eating lunch and walking around a small park that’s up there.

Our final dinner was at a nice French restaurant near our hotel in Geneva.  I ordered “beef tartare,” which I figured was some variation of beef with tartar sauce, or something like that–but my guess was lost in translation.  When I got the dish, I was surprised to see it was barely-cooked beef, finely chopped and mixed with onion, pepper, and other seasonings, and spread over buttered bread.  I typically don’t like “raw” meat, but this dish wasn’t bad, and was certainly unique.

Tomorrow will be a long day—we fly Geneva to London to Atlanta, which is roughly 11 hours of combined flying.

The view of Geneva and Lake Geneva from the top of Mont Saleve

Friday, May 26

The flight home wasn’t as bad as I expected.  On the Geneva to London flight, I had a window seat, which provided a great final view of the Alps and Lake Geneva, as well as a distant view of Paris.  The second flight (London to Atlanta), I listened to music and watched some of the in-flight entertainment, and slept some.

I’m writing this on Saturday afternoon, and I am so grateful we flew back yesterday and not today, because British Airways has had a massive IT failure and all flights in London are cancelled.

I’m glad to be home, because I’m excited about sharing my experiences with everyone.  But I do already miss the experience of being in and exploring new places, seeing things I haven’t seen before, trying different food, and learning about the culture and history of another place.

Traveling abroad is such a fulfilling experience, which I would recommend to anyone and everyone.  This was my first foreign trip, but certainly won’t be my last.