Fans Week: Fast Five – Famous Fans

There are millions of sports fans, but some are more famous than others.

As Stiles on Sports Fans Week comes to a close, here’s a look at some of the most famous fans in the sports world.

Honorable Mention:  Marlins Man

Laurence Leavy, better known to diehards and casual fans alike as Marlins Man, is a famous sports fan after becoming a pseudo-celebrity through his attendance of many high-profile sporting events.

The 60-year old owner of a Miami law firm, who does most of his work from hotels on his laptop, travels the country to attend events in a variety of sports–particularly championship events and nearly every Sunday Night Baseball game–usually sitting behind home plate at baseball games and behind the bench at basketball games.

He wears bright orange Miami Marlins apparel, and typically stands out on television broadcasts (especially when orange is not a team color for either team in the game).  Leavy has over 71,000 Twitter followers, and is often seen taking pictures with fans at games.

 

5.  Darius Rucker

It is well known that Hootie and the Blowfish front man and country artist Darius Rucker is a huge fan of his alma mater, the University of South Carolina, where Hootie and the Blowfish was formed in 1986.  Rucker, 51, has often performed concerts wearing a South Carolina hat.

Rucker’s love for the Gamecocks was on full display this spring–he watched the men’s basketball team’s Sweet 16 game against Baylor on TV monitors while performing on March 24, then attended the East Regional Final at Madison Square Garden on March 26.  When the Gamecocks beat Florida to reach the Final Four, Rucker could not hide his emotion, and was moved to tears.

Rucker also used his platform to show his support for South Carolina:  At this year’s ACM Awards, which were held just hours after South Carolina women’s basketball won the national championship, Rucker said “Big ups to the Lady Gamecocks, national champions,” while presenting the Album of the Year award.

4.  Jack Nicholson

While all the Los Angeles teams have plenty of A-listers who frequently attend their games, none are bigger fans than Jack Nicholson.

The 80-year old actor, who has more Academy Award nominations than any male actor in history, has held season tickets with the Lakers since 1970.  He has sat courtside near the visiting bench for many years, first at The Forum then at Staples Center.

Nicholson has occasionally argued with game officials or even opposing players, and one official at a 2003 Lakers playoff game nearly ejected him for arguing a call.

3.  Presidents of the United States

Beyond the tradition of championship teams visiting the White House, the presidency has often been held a sports fan, with a few even having ties to the sports world.

Presidents have often thrown out the first pitch on Opening Day in Washington, with some even traveling to Baltimore in the periods Washington was without a team, and at World Series games, including George W. Bush at Yankee Stadium after 9/11, who even threw a strike while wearing a bulletproof vest.


Several presidents played football or baseball in college.  This includes Gerald Ford, who was an All-American center and two-time national champion at Michigan and turned down NFL offers to attend law school, and George H.W. Bush, who reached the College World Series as Yale’s first baseman.

Among presidents the last four decades:  Jimmy Carter is an Atlanta Braves fan, who attends several games per year; Ronald Reagan played George Gipp (“the Gipper”) in the film Knute Rockne, All American; George H.W. Bush often attended Houston sporting events before his health declined; Bill Clinton is an avid golfer and served as tournament host of the PGA Tour’s CareerBuilder Challenge from 2012-16; George W. Bush was head of an investment group that owned the Texas Rangers from 1989-1994; Barack Obama is a diehard Chicago White Sox fan; Donald Trump is a New York Yankees fan and a friend of the Steinbrenner family that owns the team.

2.  Spike Lee

There may not be a bigger fan of New York sports than Spike Lee.  The 60-year old filmmaker is an avid fan of the New York Knicks and New York Yankees.

Lee is a Knicks season ticket holder, sitting courtside and often interacting with players and officials.  This includes Reggie Miller famously taunting Lee with a hand gesture imitating a chokehold after the Miller’s Pacers completed a fourth quarter comeback to beat the Knicks in the playoffs.

In 2004, before Game 7 of the ALCS at Yankee Stadium (in which the Boston Red Sox completed a comeback from down 3-0 in the series to win the pennant 4-3), Lee was asked to compare drama written into a film script to the epic drama playing out on the field in the series.

“Movies… that stuff is fake,”  Lee said.  “That’s why sports is the greatest–it can’t be scripted.”

1.  Bill Murray

There aren’t many people in America more famous than Bill Murray, and there aren’t many people who are bigger sports fans either.  The 66-year old actor and comedian has many sports connections, although the Chicago native is most associated with the Cubs.

Murray is a lifelong diehard Cubs fan, and was an occasional guest commentator on Cubs WGN broadcasts in the 1980s.  He is a frequent guest conductor of “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” at the seventh inning stretch, including Game 3 of the 2016 World Series.  Murray was present when the Cubs clinched the World Series title, and was invited to participate in the champagne celebration with the team in the locker room.

Murray was also present when the Braves won the 1995 World Series at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, as a guest of then-Braves owner Ted Turner.

Multiple minor and independent league baseball teams are partially owned by Murray:  the Charleston RiverDogs, Hudson Valley Renegades, Brockton Rox and St. Paul Saints; Murray was inducted into the South Atlantic League Hall of Fame in 2012 for contributions to the league as part-owner in Charleston.

Murray’s son Luke is an assistant basketball coach at Xavier, where Murray often attends games to support him.  Luke previously worked on the coaching staffs at Quinnipiac, Arizona, Wagner, Towson and Rhode Island.

Murray is associated with golf through his performance in the 1980 film Caddyshack, but is a decent player himself, and with PGA Tour pro D.A. Points won the 2011 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am.  Murray worked as a caddy as a teenager in Chicago.

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