Fast Five: Best athletes to retire before 30

New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski announced his retirement from the game at age 29.

But while Gronkowski’s announcement came as a shock to the sports world, he’s not the first player at his level to retire young.

Several star athletes have retired before the age of 30; here’s a look at the five best.

As a disclaimer, this list does not include athletes who made a comeback after retiring at age 30, or from sports that a competitor retiring in their 20s is common (i.e. gymnastics).

5. Brandon Roy

Brandon Roy was an All-American at Washington before winning NBA Rookie of the Year in 2007 with the Portland Trail Blazers. He averaged 20.2 points and 5.0 assists per game over his first four seasons with Portland, was twice named All-NBA and made three All-Star appearances. Kobe Bryant once called Roy “the hardest player to guard in the Western Conference,” saying the guard’s game had no weaknesses.

Knee injuries, which had bothered Roy since college, caused limitations during the 2010-11 season before Roy announced in the following offseason that he had been diagnosed with a degenerative knee condition and would retire.

Roy attempted a comeback in the 2012-13 season, but played just five games for the Minnesota Timberwolves before re-injuring his right knee and retiring for good at age 28 in 2013. After the high level of play shown in his first four seasons, Roy’s career is one of the great what-ifs in recent basketball history.

4. Rob Gronkowski

“Gronk,” known not just for his incredible play on the field but for the fun he had both on and off the field, retires as arguably the greatest tight end in NFL history.

Gronkowski’s 79 touchdown receptions in just nine seasons are both a Patriots franchise record and the most by any NFL player since he came into the league, and he led the league with 17 receiving touchdowns in 2011, a rare feat for a tight end. He holds the all-time playoff records for a tight end in receptions (81), receiving yards (1,163) and receiving touchdowns (12), helping lead the Patriots to five Super Bowl appearances and three championships during his tenure.

The only thing Gronkowski has struggled with is injuries, as he hasn’t played all 16 games in a season since 2011, and perhaps that played a role in his decision to retire. He will turn 30 in May.

3. Justine Henin

Despite a short career, Belgian tennis star Justine Henin won seven grand-slam titles and spent 117 weeks ranked No. 1 in the world.

Her seven grand-slam titles came between 2003-07 and included four French Open titles and two U.S. Opens. She reached the final of all four majors in 2006 and is the only player in history to win consecutive French Open titles without losing a set (2006-07).

Henin retired abruptly and immediately as the sitting World No. 1 in May 2008, citing fatigue. She made a comeback in 2010 and reached the Australian Open final, losing in three sets to Serena Williams, but after reaggravating an elbow injury opted to retire again in January 2011 at age 28.

2. Bobby Jones

Bobby Jones was the greatest amateur golfer of all-time — he never turned professional — and had one of the greatest careers in the history of the game, all accomplished in a short timespan.

By modern standards, Jones won seven major championships — four U.S. Opens and three Open Championships. But by the standards of the day, when the U.S. Amateur and British Amateur were considered as majors, he won 13 major championships.

Jones won what was then considered the Grand Slam — the U.S. Open, the Open Championship, the U.S. Amateur and The British Amateur — in 1930, and retired from competitive golf at age 28 following the feat.

After Jones co-designed Augusta National with Alister McKenzie and co-founding The Masters, Jones did play in the first 15 Masters tournaments, but only on an exhibition basis; his appearances helped attract media attention to the event, helping it become what it is today.

1. Jim Brown

Jim Brown is widely considered one of the greatest NFL players of all-time, yet he walked away from the game while he was still in his prime.

In nine seasons, Brown led the league in rushing yards eight times and in rushing touchdowns five times. He was named NFL MVP in 1957, 1958 and 1965, his first, second and last seasons.

Brown played his final game at age 29 and retired before the 1966 season to pursue an acting career. At the time of his retirement, Brown had the most rushing attempts (2,359), yards (12,312) and touchdowns (106) in NFL history, and he remains the record-holder for most career rushing yards per game (104.3).

Despite his short career, The Sporting News named Brown the greatest NFL player of all-time in 2002. He is not only in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, but also in the Lacrosse Hall of Fame after a stellar collegiate career at Syracuse.

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